TALES FROM A HIJABI FOOTBALLER

I smash assumptions.

4 notes

"…while another woman wears a fiery red Manchester United t-shirt that accents her head scarf"The most ridiculously ignorant article I have read in awhile. 
BECAUSE AFRICANS DO NOT KNOW FOOTBALL. UNLESS IT IS A TRIBAL RITUAL.
#hijabdesk
What was Yaya Toure saying again?
So, I continue my rant about this horrible article from the Daily Mail. 
Truthfully even the HEADER of this piece is infuriating. 
Unsurprisingly the Daily Mail continues to offend with their ignorance and misunderstanding of simple things; such as the global phenomenon that is football and what tribal Africans are familiar with.
Granted the pictures are beautiful. Eric Lafforgue’s work is fantastic. Mostly because the men and women featured are beautiful.
The article which accompanies the pictures is absurd. 
The piece gravitates between explaining that tribal community members from a region in Ethiopia select kits and jerseys because of the colours and that they have no understanding of anything else.
Football is the world’s game. It the mostly played sport on earth. And adoration of football is no exception.
  
Football is not only used to unite the people of Ethiopia but also as a tool regarding different positions of socio-economic issues and politics- much like the rest of the world.
Ethiopia is a proud and active member of CAF (Confederation of African Football).
Their supporters are diverse and joyful.

They have recently acquired Portuguese manager, Mariano Barretto, to take the reins and develop the squad and foster new talent from the country’s program. 
Like any other footballing nation, this does not mean that Ethiopia has not struggled with development and ability to compete in AFCON. They recently returned to the highest level of African competition after a 31 year drought. 
It also does not mean that all Ethiopians do not have an understanding or grasp of the game. 
One could argue that tribes in remote corners of Ethiopia might not have as much access to televised matches. A point with which the photographer does not concur as he posted similarly-themed pictures before.
The Daily Mail came across the photographs several years later and perhaps had a slow news day. In which after writing about the lack of comprehension of sport from certain Omo Valley inhabitants, they included bits and pieces about their “tribal” [clearly a word fancied by The Daily Mail] rituals and explains their partnering rituals (involving cows) in deep detail.  
What all that has to do with English Premier League jerseys, I am not too sure. The article begins with pictures of Africans smiling wearing English kits with pride and ends with tales of orphaned, abandoned babies who are left to die.
Again, no correlation to the featured pictures but oh well.  Any story about Africans must have a mandatory bit about their barbaric practices.Good things that they were gifted with these kits otherwise WHO KNOWS what they would have worn? Wait, you mean there are century-old traditions of their own dress? 
The vacuous article is not only offensive to me, as a person of colour, who resents such pieces by ignorant white journalists Anna Edwards in this particular instance. But offensive to me as a football fanatic and admirer of African football; that has a rich and wonderful traditions and fosters incredible athletes. Perhaps Daily Mail staff might want to do some research about it to clarify any misconceptions and assumptions. 
Perhaps, Ms.Edwards and some Daily Mail staff might be keen to travel to tribal villages of Omo Valley and challenge the community members to a nice game of footy…if not some cattle jumping.

Interested in reading Full POS piece—->
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2457632/African-Premier-League-fans-pictured-favourite-English-football-shirts.html
 

"…while another woman wears a fiery red Manchester United t-shirt that accents her head scarf"

The most ridiculously ignorant article I have read in awhile. 

BECAUSE AFRICANS DO NOT KNOW FOOTBALL. UNLESS IT IS A TRIBAL RITUAL.

#hijabdesk

What was Yaya Toure saying again?

So, I continue my rant about this horrible article from the Daily Mail.

Truthfully even the HEADER of this piece is infuriating. 

Unsurprisingly the Daily Mail continues to offend with their ignorance and misunderstanding of simple things; such as the global phenomenon that is football and what tribal Africans are familiar with.

Granted the pictures are beautiful. Eric Lafforgue’s work is fantastic. Mostly because the men and women featured are beautiful.

The article which accompanies the pictures is absurd. 

The piece gravitates between explaining that tribal community members from a region in Ethiopia select kits and jerseys because of the colours and that they have no understanding of anything else.

Football is the world’s game. It the mostly played sport on earth. And adoration of football is no exception.

  

Football is not only used to unite the people of Ethiopia but also as a tool regarding different positions of socio-economic issues and politics- much like the rest of the world.

Ethiopia is a proud and active member of CAF (Confederation of African Football).

Their supporters are diverse and joyful.


They have recently acquired Portuguese manager, Mariano Barretto, to take the reins and develop the squad and foster new talent from the country’s program. 

Like any other footballing nation, this does not mean that Ethiopia has not struggled with development and ability to compete in AFCON. They recently returned to the highest level of African competition after a 31 year drought. 

It also does not mean that all Ethiopians do not have an understanding or grasp of the game. 

One could argue that tribes in remote corners of Ethiopia might not have as much access to televised matches. A point with which the photographer does not concur as he posted similarly-themed pictures before.

The Daily Mail came across the photographs several years later and perhaps had a slow news day. In which after writing about the lack of comprehension of sport from certain Omo Valley inhabitants, they included bits and pieces about their “tribal” [clearly a word fancied by The Daily Mail] rituals and explains their partnering rituals (involving cows) in deep detail.  

What all that has to do with English Premier League jerseys, I am not too sure. The article begins with pictures of Africans smiling wearing English kits with pride and ends with tales of orphaned, abandoned babies who are left to die.

Again, no correlation to the featured pictures but oh well.  Any story about Africans must have a mandatory bit about their barbaric practices.

Good things that they were gifted with these kits otherwise WHO KNOWS what they would have worn? Wait, you mean there are century-old traditions of their own dress? 

The vacuous article is not only offensive to me, as a person of colour, who resents such pieces by ignorant white journalists Anna Edwards in this particular instance. But offensive to me as a football fanatic and admirer of African football; that has a rich and wonderful traditions and fosters incredible athletes. Perhaps Daily Mail staff might want to do some research about it to clarify any misconceptions and assumptions. 

Perhaps, Ms.Edwards and some Daily Mail staff might be keen to travel to tribal villages of Omo Valley and challenge the community members to a nice game of footy…if not some cattle jumping.

Interested in reading Full POS piece—->

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2457632/African-Premier-League-fans-pictured-favourite-English-football-shirts.html

 

Filed under Africa football kit jersey supporters racism africa is a country ethiopia omo valley Daily Mail racist tribal

23,482 notes

awkwardsituationist:

to avoid paying a construction fee, jack mubiru, a father of the skateboarding scene in uganda, fabricated a story about building a private enclosure for a pet crocodile. most local officials and neighborhood residents had never heard of skateboarding. yet six years later, the sport has spread from the skate park to the streets, attracting children as young as five and adult women.  

photographer yann gross always takes his deck with him on his journeys. during one trip to eastern africa, yann encountered a group of skaters in kitintale, a suburb of kampala, who had built the first and only half pipe in uganda. he ended up spending several months with the skaters, becoming a full member of the group, documenting a unique skate culture that, given the area’s contingencies, has styles and tricks all its own. 

text adapted from joel vacheron and julie bosman   

1,756 notes

awkwardsituationist:

by pairing skate lessons and boards with education initiatives, skateistan — a non profit organization that works with the support of local afghan communities — is using skateboarding as a tool of empowerment for more than four hundred afghan kids, many of whom live on the streets.  

more than 40 percent of skateistan’s students are female. though girls are banned from riding bikes in afghanistan, skateboarding is novel and remains permissible, and has now become the most popular sport for females in the country. 

photos from skateistan’s facebook and instagram (see also: skating in uganda)

(via globalvoices)

3 notes

They play with head-scarves, tights and long socks. We worked with them for four months, convincing their parents that playing football is not against religion. We gave references of the Iranian women’s football team. We got separate kits for these girls so that they can play the sport without feeling uncomfortable.
http://tribune.com.pk/story/697396/womens-football-diya-fc-to-field-new-talent-from-manghopir/

Filed under Pakistan football soccer girls Islam hijab headscarves

4,227 notes

And I cried. For myself. For this woman talkin’ about love. For all the women who have ever stretched their bodies out anticipating civilization and finding ruins.
Sonia Sanchez (Homegirls and Handgrenades)

(Source: likethebrimofahat, via hkubra)